Suggested Aftercare Products For Oral Piercing

Recognizing and treating an infection is very important. Untreated infections can lead to deformity, especially in oral (mouth) piercings. Oral piercings such as Lip and tongue piercings cause dental problems ranging from gum damage and chipped teeth to much more serious conditions, such as blood infections that lead to death.

Biotene / Tech 2000: Produced by Care-Tech Laboratories, Inc., this is the most recommended anti-microbial mouthwash for the care of your new oral piercing. It is highly effective at reducing bacteria while also being very gentle on oral tissue.

Listerine: Though this antiseptic mouthwash is very good at keeping your mouth clean of any infection, it is also very irritating due to high alcohol content. It may over-dry the mouth which greatly impedes the healing process. In my opinion, it should only be used in small amounts and in extreme cases.

Gly-Oxide / Peroxyl: Another commonly recommended mouth rinse, these peroxide based mouthwashes lift out debris. However, these products can weaken your mouths ability to heal naturally. This may lead to thrush, dry mouth, and other complications.

Provon: Provon brand soap is a brand of anti-microbial soap produced by GOJO Industries, Inc. commonly recommended by piercing studios. It is non-toxic and biodegradable. It contains the degerming agent PCMX (03%) 0.3% chloroxylenol. The producers of this soap also advertise that it softens hands while cleaning. This soap is commonly used in the medical practice due to it's high quality. It can also be used for cleaning healed piercings or jewelry, aiding greatly in the reduction of some piercing-related smells.

Satin: Anti-microbial soaps containing PCMX (chloroxylenol), very effective at fighting bacteria but still very gentle to the skin. Produced by Caretech Lab, it is highly recommended for new piercings and considered an effective replacement for Provon for those with sensitive skin.

Dial / Softsoap: Most commonly used antibacterial soaps, which can easily be found pretty much anywhere. This brand icontains the active ingredient Triclosan, which can be over-drying and irritating to some. if you are using an antibacterial soap try using the sensitive skin version of this product to avoid excess dyes and perfumes.

Sea Salt water solution
Dissolve 1/4 a teaspoon of sea salt in eight ounces of warm clean water. Use on a cotton swab to clean you piercing daily. You can also use sea salt water as a soak or compress to help heal irritated piercings. Used daily this can help speed up the healing process safely and effectively. Make sure you do not use the salt soak too frequently as this can over-dry your skin. Use only pure sea salt with no additives or preservatives, which is available at some supermarkets, vitamin stores, and all health food stores. DO NOT USE table salt or epsom salt, these are not the same as sea salt and will cause damage and discomfort to your piercing.

Remember: Complications are possible if you choose unprofessional piercer, if you pick some improper body jewel ( especially for the first piercing ) and If you don' follow your piercer's aftercare tips.

Piercing - Dental Issues
Before you go and make your appointment, you should think more carefully. By only using reputable piercers and following all aftercare instructions, you can reduce your risk of infection. Recognizing and treating an infection is very important. Untreated infections can lead to deformity, especially in oral (mouth) piercings.

Oral piercings such as Lip and tongue piercings cause dental problems ranging from gum damage and chipped teeth to much more serious conditions, such as blood infections that lead to death.

Some possible risks are included in the healing period, such as:

Swallowing and Infection
There is a risk of swallowing the piercing. Playing with the stud and natural tongue movement may loosen the fastening. There is a risk of choking and in some cases, the barbell can get stuck in the lungs. Dental Health also points out that there are a number of major blood vessels connecting the tongue to the brain and that piercings can lead to infections in the blood that travel to other organs, including the brain.

Gums and Gaps
Tongue and lip piercings increase the risk of gum disease. Although lip piercings don't usually cause tooth damage, the metal rubs against the external gums. Tongue piercings rub the inner gums and cause the same type of damage. This damage sometimes requires gum surgery. This usually happens by playing with the stud and pushing it hard against the back of the front teeth.

Chipping
Tongue jewelry is usually in the barbell style. A straight bar goes through the tongue with a decorative stud on the tongue's surface and a small stud under the tongue to hold it in place. People with a barbell tongue piercing are in danger of chipping and cracking their front teeth. This is due to tongue movement, and the fact that many people with piercings tend to play with them by clicking them against the teeth. In some cases, teeth are broken. Most barbell tongue jewelry is made of metal, which is tough on tooth enamel. A slightly safer solution is acrylic barbell jewelry.

Nerve Damage
Having the tongue pierced is a risk in itself. If a major blood vessel in the tongue is damaged during piercing, it will require surgery to repair it. It can also cause substantial blood loss. Nerve damage is another risk. The tongue is full of nerves and damage to any one of them is irreparable. It may cause the tongue to lose all its functions. Tongue piercings are also associated with toothache, or neuralgia.

Remember: Usually, All this complications could happen if you choose unprofessional piercer, if you pick some improper body jewel ( especially for the first piercing ) and If you don' follow your piercer's aftercare tips.

CHECK OUT:

Genital Piercing Risks
Body Piercing-Healing Phases
Saline Solution-What to Use & How to Soak
Antibacterial Products for Piercing
Piercing Aftercare Awareness